Frequently Asked Questions

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Notice: I have been quite busy lately so if you email me, please be patient if I do not respond right away. I will get back to you as soon as possible. Thanks for your understanding. ~Sue

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Q: What is the treble crochet stitch and how do I make it?

A: The treble stitch (tr) is like the double crochet stitch (dc) except you put the yarn over the hook twice instead of once. Here is how to make the treble stitch:
Yarn over hook twice,
insert hook in stitch,
yarn over hook and draw loop through,
yarn over hook, pull through 2 loops on hook,
yarn over hook, pull through 2 loops on hook,
yarn over hook, pull through last 2 loops on hook.

Q: I just ordered a pattern from ebay for a nightgown for an American Girl Doll. In the instructions it refers to "w.r.n. - wool round needle" and "w.o.n = wool on needle". I have never heard these terms before and wondering if you knew what they are. In the instructions it says to K.1, K.2 tog., w.r.n. P3, w.o.n., sl. 1, K2 tog., ps.s.o, w.r.n. I understand all the other terms in the instructions except the won and wrn. I haven't tried the pattern yet and I'm wondering if it means "yarn over" or something similar to that.

A: They basically mean the same thing, however after you knit a stitch or purl a stitch, your wool will be either at the back or front. So it is yarn over, but an older way of describing it. I think most newer patterns just use the "yarn over" and everyone seems to understand how to do it after a knit or purl stitch.

For example, say you just did a purl stitch, your wool would be at the front of your work. Instead of putting it to the back for the next knit stitch, the instructions say to "w.o.n". That means to lay your wool over the top of the needle to the back and then do your next knit stitch.

Say you just did a purl stitch and the instructions say "w.r.n" before you do another purl stitch. As your wool is at the front of your work after you made your first purl stitch, "w.r.n" means to wrap your wool around the needle, in other words put your wool over the needle to the back and bring it around under the needle to the front and then do your next purl stitch.

If the instructions say to "w.r.n" after a knit stitch and before you do a purl stitch, your wool would be at the back of your work after the knit stitch, so bring it to the front under your needle as you would normally do when making a purl stitch, then put it over your needle to the back and under your needle to the front again.

Q: How do you make a 5 tr cluster?

A: Here is how to make the 5 treble cluster:

Yarn over hook twice and insert into first stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, yarn over hook and pull through two loops on hook, yarn over hook and pull through two loops on hook again, you now have two loops on your hook.

Yarn over twice and insert into second stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, yarn over and pull through two loops on your hook, yarn over and pull through two loops on your hook again. You now have 3 loops on your hook.

Yarn over twice and insert into third stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, yarn over and pull through two loops on your hook, yarn over and pull through two loops on your hook again. You now have 4 loops on your hook.

Yarn over twice and insert into fourth stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, yarn over and pull through two loops on your hook, yarn over and pull through two loops on your hook again. You now have 5 loops on your hook.

Yarn over twice and insert into fifth stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, yarn over and pull through two loops on your hook, yarn over and pull through two loops on your hook again. You now have 6 loops on your hook.

Yarn over hook and pull through all 6 loops on your hook. That completes the 5 tr cluster.

Q: How do you dc2tog?

A: To double crochet 2 together, Yarn over, insert hook in first stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, yarn over and pull through two loops on hook. Yarn over and insert into second stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, yarn over and pull through two loops on hook. Yarn over and pull through all three loops on hook.

Q: I am working on a pattern that says to dc 5 sts tog. How do you do that?

A: Hello, Here is how to dc (double crochet) 5 sts together.
Yarn over hook, insert hook into the stitch, yarn over hook and pull up a loop, then yarn over hook and pull through 2 loops (do not finish the dc, leave the last loop on your hook). Do the above, 4 more times over the next 4 stitches. You will now have 6 loops on your hook. To complete, yarn over hook and pull through all 6 loops on your hook.

Q: Where can I find the Dutch Boy and Girl Quilt Pattern?

A: I did a search online and found a picture of the Dutch Boy and Girl Quilt on this page. Crase's Quilts.
The email address is at the bottom of the page. You could contact the website owner and ask if they have the pattern.
I also found this post at
http://www.quiltersnewsletter.com/bboard/pattern/messages/4293.htm
Re: Dutch Boy Pattern
There is a pattern for a Dutch Boy and Dutch Girl in the Quiltworks Issue No.54 March 1998. The pattern is called Dutch Children. Back issues are available at http://www.quilttownusa.com/
The patterns are not really any different then the Sunbonnet Sue or Sam pattern, which you can find patterns for at www.sunbonnetsue.com. This site has both free and purchase patterns.
Also found this post at:
http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/QUILTING/2000-01/0948665932
Dutch Boy and Girl are what we now call Sunbonnet Sue and Overall Sam.

Q: What is a "seed stitch"?

A: Here is how to do the seed stitch:
Cast on an even number of stitches:
Row 1: *K1, P1, repeat from * to end of the row.
Row 2: *P1, K1, repeat from * to end of the row.
Repeat these 2 rows to desired length. For a picture of the seed stitch used in a sweater see http://www.knittingbiz.com/pictures_of_sweaters.html Click on the first picture "Cassidy", sweater three for a clear view of the seed stitch.

Q: I hope you can help, do you know of anywhere where I can find out how to convert the wool in your patterns to the British equivalent. What I really need to know is how the wool you use converts to the brands we use here, our yarn go under 2 ply, 3 ply, 4 ply, double knitting and so on.

A: The following information was from a site that is no longer available.

UK v US
4-ply = Sportweight
Doubleknitting = Light Worsted
Aran = Fisherman or Medium weight
Chunky = Bulky
More information on Yarn Equivalents can be found on these sites:
http://www.thewoolshack.com.au/helpinghands.htm
http://www.crochetcabana.com/yarn_yak.htm

Q: What's the big difference between sports yarn and worsted weight?

The following information is from the Lion Brand Yarn Guide
A: Worsted weight is a measure of thickness that originally applied only to worsted spun wool. It has come to be used to describe any fiber of that traditional thickness.

WEIGHT: This refers to how thick the yarn is. There are a number of standard thickness' for yarn. These include:
* FINGERING YARN: A loosely spun, very lightweight yarn used for babywear, socks, and other delicate items.
* SPORT YARN: A medium weight yarn used for babywear, sweaters, and lightweight throws.
* WORSTED WEIGHT YARN: The most popular weight for knitting and crocheting. An ideal weight for throws.
* CHUNKY YARN: Heavier than worsted weight, chunky yarn works up quickly and easily for such things as hats, scarves, and throws.
* BULKY YARN: A very heavy yarn, about twice as thick as worsted weight.
YARN EQUIVALENTS: A method of approximating yarn equivalents:
Two strands fingering equal one strand sport.
Two strands sport equal one strand worsted.
Two strands worsted equal one strand bulky.

Q: How do you do the reverse single crochet stitch?

A: Reverse single crochet is usually used as an edging. You work the sc from left to right instead of the usual right to left. With a little practice, it's not difficult at all and looks very nice. Here are some links that describe how to do it.

Learn How to do Reverse Single Crochet, also called Crab Stitch - incudes illustrations.
DAPHNE'S TUTORIAL - STITCHES(III)

Q: I am looking for a specific pattern that is very hard to find. How do you find patterns on the Internet?

A: I don't know where to find all patterns, but here are some places to search:

Lots of Patterns here:
http://www.freepatterns.com
http://www.seafore.com/
http://home.inreach.com/marthac/links.html - very well organized!
The Crochet Partners Pattern Library
http://crochetpartners.org/
Crochet Musings Web Site
http://crochet.rpmdp.com/
Found Room
http://www.knitting-crochet.com/found/
Knitting Patterns
http://home.inreach.com/marthac/knit/knitsites.html
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/9197/pattern.htm
http://www.crochet.about.com - indexed site offering free patterns. Could help those who are looking to find patterns with themes, (animals etc).
You could also type the pattern you are looking for into any Search Engine.
I've had good luck finding patterns by using Google and Alta Vista.

Or you could post your search for any particular
pattern on my Pattern Search Board. Someone may be able to help you there.

Q: I am trying your 'Crocheted Slippers, Moccasin Style' and am stuck at RNDS 8 & 9 of the sides of slipper where you have to work over previous rnds. My computer is old, so I can't see pictures on websites, just text, so I don't know what the slipper is suppose to look like. It looks okay so far, but I'm not sure where exactly I'm suppose to be putting the slip stitches on RND 8 & 9, because it says 'do not turn' so when I attempt to do the stitches, it just looks like a zigzag, so I don't know which direction I'm suppose to be going. Are they suppose to be surface slip stitches or reverse stitches? By the time I've done the '1 ss in the next 12 ss of RND 4, 1 ss in the next 3 sc of RND 4', I'm further along the row that I've noticed I'm too far to attempt to do the next instruction in the pattern, which says '1 ss in the turning ch of RND 5', which would be going backwards. I tried unravelling and starting over, and putting stitch markers to indicate where in the previous rows the slip stitches are suppose to go, but I still can't figure out how to do RND 8 & 9. Is there any advice you could give me so I can successfully complete RNDs 8 & 9 and continue with the pattern?

A: What you are doing is slip stitching all around the slipper before you put the top part on. It really wouldn't make any difference if you follow my directions exactly. I tried to write it up so that you would know that you are working over all ends of the previous rounds. So, the best advice I could give you, without you being able to see the picture, is to just continue placing your slip stitches where you think they should go to finish off this round. Don't worry if they look sort of zig zagged. They will straighten out with the next round.

Q: Is the Triple Crochet the same stitch as the Treble?

A: Yes, the Triple Crochet is the same as the Treble Crochet. Most patterns will call this stitch the "Treble Crochet".

Q: Where can I find a complete guide on stuff like...what is a treble crochet....what is a single crochet...etc.....

A: The Crochet Guild of America has online crochet lessons with illustrations. Just click on left or right hand lessons, then scroll down past "Getting Started: The Basics" to "Getting Started: The Stitches". Here you will find a description of each stitch and the stitch names are all clickable. Click on each one for an illustration (drawings) of how to make them. http://www.crochet.com/lessons/lesson.html

Q: How do you HDC (half double crochet) 2 stitches tog?

A: To hdc 2 together, wrap yarn over the hook, insert hook into the stitch, put yarn over the hook and draw up a loop, then insert the hook into the next stitch, yarn over the hook and pull up a loop. Put the yarn over the hook and draw through all loops on the hook.

Q: I heard that crochet patterns could be converted into knitting patterns. Is this true? If so, how do you convert them?

A: Yes, it can be done either way, crochet to knit or knit to crochet. Here's a few sites that tells you how to do it.
Converting Patterns Between Knit and Crochet
Knit to Crochet Conversion
How to Exchange Knitting to Crochet or Crochet to Knitting - This is a book that sells for $19.95. It tells you how to convert any knitting stitch to a crochet stitch. Or vise versa.

Q: What do you mean by back loops?

A: You will notice that a crochet stitch (single, double, etc) has two loops on the top. To crochet through the front loops only, you would insert your hook through the loop in front, which is towards you. To crochet through the back loops only, you would insert your hook into the loop behind the front loop.

Q: (Slippers Pattern) My question is on the bottom, I really don't understand the RND that says you Chain 1, 1 ss in each stitch all around through bottom loops only. (This makes a ridge)

A: On this RND, you crochet slip stitches through one loop only, the loop at the bottom, which is the front loop. I called it the "bottom loop" in the sole instructions because most people will be looking at the sole as lying horizontally. From that view, the 2 loops on the top of the stitches looks more like a top and bottom loop than a back and front loop. By crocheting slip stitches through the bottom (front) loop only, you will notice that it forms a turning ridge around the sole. This turn is so you can crochet the sides of the slipper.

In case you didn't know, a slip stitch (ss) is the same stitch you make when you crochet a chain. To make the slip stitches on this RND, insert your hook into the bottom (front) loop of a stitch, put the yarn over your hook and pull up a loop and pull it through the loop on your hook. Do this in every stitch of this RND.

Q: What's 2 sc tog (twice)?

A: This is where you decrease the number of stitches by crocheting 2 stitches together. Where I put (twice) means to do it 2 times. To crochet 2 sc together, insert your hook into the next stitch, put the yarn over your hook and pull up a loop, leaving that loop on your hook, insert your hook into the next stitch, put the yarn over your hook and pull up another loop, next put the yarn over your hook and pull through the 3 loops on your hook. You will now have 1 single crochet (sc) where there was 2 before.

A: I have a question on your moccasin style slippers. Could you tell me what is round and a slip stitch . I am a beginner crocheter.

A: A "round" is the same as a "row" except that it connects to the first stitch of the round by a slip stitch (ss). So you are crocheting in the round instead of in a row.

A slip stitch (abreviated "ss") is the same as a chain stitch. You know how you make a stitch when you are making a chain. A slip stitch is done the same way, but it is used to join a "Round" by inserting your hook into the first stitch you made in the Round, yarn over your hook and pull up a loop and pull through the stitch on your hook.

Q: I have been attempting the Crocheted slippers pattern. I am a size 5 so I tried to adjust the pattern by subtracting two chs but after that nothing seems to add up even while I remember to keep subtracting for each round.

A: The pattern is really very versatile. If you find that the count on the stitches is not exactly as the pattern says, it really doesn't make much difference. I usually make these slippers without counting stitches at all after I have made the bottom (sole).

The main thing is to get the front at the toe end, to be centered. You wouldn't want the top to be lopsided. As you will see on the pattern I have showed you how to make sure that the top is going to be centered.

RND 5 - 1 sc in next 42 sts, ** This will not be 42 sts if you are making the slippers smaller or larger. To determine how many stitches you need here, count the sts all around and find the center mark at the toe end. 13 sts are needed across the toe, so count back from the center st to evenly place these 13 sts across the toe end. (Don't worry if one side has one st more than the other side. This will not affect the look of the slippers) Then count back to the beginning to see how many sts you need to crochet before starting the next step below.

So don't worry about the sides if you are not getting the exact amount of stitches. The main thing is to get the bottom (sole) right. I have made slippers before that it all works out exactly as in the pattern, but there have been times when it wouldn't and I can't figure out why! Sometimes with the first slipper I would make, it would go well, but then the second one would give me problems even though I am doing the very same thing as I did with the first one!

So to fix that problem, if I end up with an extra stitch after doing a round, I would simply crochet 2 together to bring it to the right count. If I ended up with a stitch less than the count says, I would put 2 crochet in the last stitch to bring it up to the right count. It doesn't affect the look of the slipper and you won't notice it all.

Q: I do not know what "front stitch only" and "back stitch only " are so please explain for me.

A: When you make a crochet stitch (single, double, etc) you will notice that there are 2 loops on the top of the stitch. When you are holding the right side of your work towards you, the loop closest to you is the front loop, and the loops behind it is the back loop. So if the pattern says " through back loops" you would make your crochet stitch by inserting your hook through the loop behind the front loop only and not through both loops as is normally done.

Q: What is "sp" and exactly how is it done?

A: "sp" is an abbreviation for space. In a pattern, it will usually mean to leave a space or to crochet/knit in a space.

Q: Concerning the crocheted slippers pattern, in the first few Rnds of the sides, why turn? I understand turning before Rnd done but why turn on full Rnds?

A: You turn at the end of the rounds because you are working through the back loops only of all the single crochet (sc) stitches. This gives the slippers a ribbed look. You know how the ribbing looks on the bottom of a sweater and at the ends of the sleeves? It's like that. I guess you will have to try it to see what I mean. I like this look on the slippers rather than just the straight, flat sides. It also makes them look and feel more comfy.

Q: I am just starting to knit and I need to know how. I was wondering if you could tell me where can I get some sort of "how to knit" book. Or could you just write to me giving instructions.

A: The easiest way to learn to knit would be to have someone show you, however, the next best way would be to have a video or an illustrated book that would show you how to make the stitches, hold the yarn, etc.

It would be difficult for me to give instructions through email and most likely even more difficult for you to follow such instructions! :) I do know of a site that does have basic knitting instructions including illustrations. The web address is http://www.learntoknit.com Once you enter the site, click on the link "The Basics". On that page, you will see the link "Basic Knit Instructions" along the top of the page in the center.

You can also find videos that will show you how to knit by following the link on my main page http://www.crochetandknitting.com

Q: I don't know what the abbreviation 'tog' stands for.

A: "tog" means "together". What you do is crochet 2 sc together by inserting your hook into the stitch, bring up a loop, insert your hook into the next stitch, bring up another loop, yarn over your hook and draw through all 3 loops on your hook.

Q: About the Crocheted Purse Pattern, Do I sc in all the stitches? Of the 1st 3; Last 4; last 2? There are five in each end stitch and 21 in the middle the way I'm doing it (start with 3 in what would be ch #23).

A: (Note: This pattern is being updated.) Yes, you use the single crochet (sc) for all the stitches. On the first round, you have it correct. If you have 21 stitches in the middle, that's OK. I wouldn't worry too much about the number of stitches along the sides. Just make sure each side has the same.

For example, on Round 2 - I have 22 stitches along each side. If you end up with 21 or 23, it doesn't really matter. If you ended up up with a lot more or a lot less, then you would have either a larger or smaller purse.

Rounds 1 to 4 are the base of the purse so you could always adjust the size of here by making it smaller or larger. Then the only other adjustments would be in doing the flap.

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